Hierarchical content patterns

Some generic documents with commonly understood hierarchical structures include the following:

  • Report – Title > subtitle > numbered heading level 1 > numbered heading level 2 > numbered paragraph > numbered subparagraph.
  • Book – Title > preface > chapter title > paragraph.
  • Website – Homepage > top level menu > 2nd level menu > article > image > tags.

With PageSeeder, there are two types of hierarchical patterns:

  • Standalone – using a single References document for simple medium size hierarchies.
  • Assembled – using multiple References documents for more complex large hierarchies.

These patterns use the in-built PageSeeder document types Default and References, but these can also be customized for specific requirements.

The advantages of these patterns are:

  • Easy to rearrange the content.
  • Easy to view and change the hierarchy.
  • Content can be reused by different hierarchies.

Standalone hierarchy

A standalone hierarchy can be used for simple medium size hierarchies when:

  • there is only a few hundred pages of content and;
  • only one table of contents, set of end notes, glossary and index are required.

The data is modeled as follows:

  • Content is split into Default documents up to a few pages long, ideally starting with a heading1.
  • Each Default document is split into fragments up to half a page long, ideally starting with a heading.
  • A single References document contains an XRef to each Default document with a level on each XRef indicating the hierarchy.
    • Any front matter (not part of the table of contents) should go before the TOC location in the References document.
  • XRefs in References documents should be type Embed.

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In the example above each document title is a heading 1 (H1), but when the XRef levels are processed the heading levels are modified as follows:

  • H1 – My Report
    • H2 – Overview
    • H2 – Findings
      • H3 – Finding 1
      • H3 – Finding 2
    • H2 – Conclusion

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The example above shows how the same content can be reused in a different hierarchy and appear at different levels. When the second hierarchy is processed the heading levels would be modified as follows:

  • H1 – Summary of Reports
    • H2 – My Report
      • H3 – Overview
      • H3 – Conclusion

Assembled hierarchy

An assembled hierarchy can be used for complex large size hierarchies when:

  • there is more than a few hundred pages of content or;
  • multiple table of contents, sets of end notes, glossaries or indexes are required or;
  • sets of content are to be reused by different hierarchies.

The data is modeled as follows:

  • Content is split into Default documents up to a few pages long, ideally starting with a heading1.
  • Each Default document is split into fragments up to half a page long, ideally starting with a heading.
  • Multiple References documents contain up to a few hundred XRefs to Default documents with a level on each XRef indicating the hierarchy.
    • Any front matter (not part of the table of contents) should go before the TOC location in the References document.
  • One or more References documents contain XRefs to other References documents with a level on each XRef indicating the hierarchy.
  • XRefs in References documents should be type Embed.

image006.gif

In the example above each document title is a heading 1 (H1), but when the XRef levels are processed the heading levels are modified by adding together the heading level and the levels of all the parent XRefs as follows:

  • H1 – Indonesia & Australia – Travel
    • H2 – Indonesia
      • Table of Contents
      • H3 – Info
        • H4 – Transport
      • H3 – Attractions
    • H2 – Australia
      • Table of Contents
      • H3 – Info
        • H4 – Transport
      • H3 – Attractions

Note that each country has it’s own table of contents (<toc>). Also if the Australia References document is processed by itself the heading levels would be modified differently as follows:

  • H1 – Australia
    • Table of Contents
    • H2 – Info
      • H3 – Transport
    • H2 – Attractions

Note that the Australia set of content is reused by two hierarchies: “Indonesia & Australia – Travel” and “Australia & New Zealand – Travel”.

Created on , last edited on